Holes, Louis Sachar

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I vaguely remember sitting in front of Disney Channel when I was younger and watching a movie based on this book. I remember nothing of the content of the movie except that there was a hot, sandy camp and the boys there had to dig holes. That was my introduction to this recommended reading in preparation for teaching, and it wasn’t hugely inviting, I have to say. I’m not really sure how Sachar managed to sell this novel on the premise alone (as I’m sure he must have done), but someone must have seen something in him and agreed to publish his book.

And, whilst it doesn’t even break the top ten of my favourite novels, I can see how it would benefit a class to study it.

The Premise

Stanley Yelnats comes from a family of bad luck, and his being in the wrong place at the wrong time results in him being sent to a correctional facility for 18 months, in spite of his innocence. Whilst digging holes to build his ‘character’ alongside 6 other boys, Stanley discovers his familial connections to Camp Green Lake and his unlikely friendship with Zeor (AKA Hector) leads to the breaking of the generations old curse.

Alongside the story of Stanley’s punishment, runs the history that has led him, Zero, the warden and his family to their current situations, thus making the final overcoming of the curse (if it even existed) far more exciting for the reader.

The Verdict

Sachar does a good job. Whilst most of the characters are two dimensional, Stanley is well developed as a flawed but genuine boy. His relationship with Hector experiences the ups and downs of any relationship for teenagers. Sachar does a great job of creating a realistic figure, overweight and bullied and sent away. He doesn’t so much seem to have a grasp of the genuine correctional processes or the legal process when it comes to children without parents… but as this makes for good reading and ultimately saves Hector from the camp, this can be forgiven.

The setting is potentially the most effective part of the book. Sachar does an excellent job of forming the arid landscape the camp is based in, using sand and cold showers and the endless sun to create a tired feeling of desperation. I could close my eyes and really picture the landscape, better than I could picture any of the characters.

I am a little less forgiving towards the adults in the novel. Parents who won’t hire a lawyer to help save their son, camp counsellors who discuss killing boys at risk by being stung by poisonous lizards and camp directors who withhold water, a basic human right, as punishment. The only adult character I garner a little sympathy for is the warden, Miss Walker, and that is simply because of her passing comment that ‘even on Christmas’ she had to dig holes to try to find the ‘treasure’ that was buried somewhere in the dried up lake. However, her almost comical poisonous nail varnish, and lack of humanity mean that sympathy is outweighed by hatred. It’s the same problem I’ve had with most of the boys at the camp – there’s just no real character development there. According to Amazon, this is a novel written for teenagers, and I think Sachar should have given them the benefit of the doubt that they could understand more complex characters.

To Teach or Not To Teach

I have less of a problem teaching this than I do Great Expectations. It’s not a GCSE text, it’s aimed at younger teenagers, and as a result it’s shorter, more manageable as a whole class text – I would expect a class to read this in a few short weeks (I have literally read it in a day…).

The simplicity of the other characters allows a real focus on Stanley and his character development. Pupils will be able to study other characters in relation to Stanley, giving them an idea of how to compare characters in literature and discuss the impact of each actions on one person.

The novel is packed with simplistic but effective descriptions, and the language used is analysable by younger years.

The story itself, whilst seeming lacking to me, should hold the interest of a class to see what happens, and the use of male protagonists means that boys should engage with the text with special interest.

Finally,  the use of flashback and story-within-a-story techniques give openings for discussions and essays written about their use and how effective they really were.

All of this means that Holes, whilst not a work of literary greatness, is a great text to teach and should engage pupils of a variety of ages and walks of life.

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